All Infill Pattern Types In Cura And Prusa Explained

Infill patterns in 3D printing refer to the internal structure that the printer creates within the object. These patterns can vary from simple grids to complex structures like triangles, hexagons, gyroids, and many more. The choice of infill pattern can significantly impact the strength, weight, and printing time of your 3D-printed object. So here in this article, I will cover every single infill pattern that is available in Cura and Prusa 3D slicer.

List of All 25 Infill Patterns in Cura And Prusa 3D Slicer:

If we combine infill patterns of both Cura and Prusa slicers you will find a total of 25 infill patterns. Many patterns are available in both and some are present only either in Cura or Prusa. Let’s look at them one by one.

 1. Grid: Grid infill pattern is available in Cura and Prusa Slicer. This is a simple infill pattern that provides good strength in all directions. It resembles a crisscross pattern, similar to a grid, providing a good balance between strength and material usage. It’s one of the most commonly used infill patterns due to its effectiveness and efficiency.

Grid Infill In 3D Printing

2. Lines: Lines infill patterns you can find in the slicing software Cura. This pattern involves the print head moving back and forth in a straight line to fill the interior of the print. It’s a simple and fast infill pattern, often used for models that don’t require high strength. It may not be as strong as other more complex patterns like Cubic or Honeycomb.

lines Infill Pattern

3. Triangles: Triangles infill pattern is available in both Cura and Prusa Slicer. This pattern uses a series of triangles to fill the interior of the print, providing a good balance between strength and material usage.

Triangular Infill Pattern

4. Tri-hexagon: Tri-hexagon is another type of infill pattern available in Cura. It’s a combination of triangles and hexagons, providing a balance between strength and material usage. It’s a good choice for models that need to be sturdy but not overly heavy.

Tri-hexagon Infill Pattern

5. Cubic: Cubic is a type of infill pattern available in Cura and Prusa Slicer. This pattern stacks cubes on top of each other, with each layer rotated slightly from the one below it. This results in a strong infill that uses less material than some other types, and it’s particularly effective for parts that need to be strong in all directions.

Cubic Infill Pattern

6. Cubic Subdivision: Cubic Subdivision is another type of infill pattern available in Cura. This pattern is a variation of the cubic infill, but with a twist. Instead of all cubes being the same size, the cubes are subdivided into smaller cubes, creating a more complex and potentially stronger internal structure. This can be beneficial for parts that need to be particularly strong or durable.

Cubic Subdivision Infill Pattern

7. Octet: Octet infill pattern is available in Cura. Octet in 3D printing doesn’t refer to a specific printer model, but rather to a unique infill pattern utilized during the printing process. This Octet infill pattern is characterized by its octagonal shapes that are used to fill the interior of a 3D printed object, thereby offering support and structure. The pattern, named for the eight-sided shape that recurs throughout, is renowned for enhancing the strength and stability of the printed objects. Moreover, the Octet pattern is recognized for its efficient use of material in 3D printing applications.

Octet Infill Pattern

8. Quarter Cubic: Quarter Cubic infill pattern is available in Cura. This pattern is characterised by a three-dimensional grid structure that is divided into quarters, hence the name. It’s designed to provide a balance between strength and material usage, making it a popular choice for many 3D printing applications.

Quarter Cubic Infill Pattern

9. Concentric: Concentric is a type of infill pattern available in various slicing software like Cura and Prusa. This pattern lays down the infill in concentric circles (or shapes matching the outer perimeter) within the object, which can be aesthetically pleasing and can provide good strength in the horizontal direction. However, it may not be as strong as other patterns like grid or triangular when it comes to withstanding forces from different directions.

Concentric Infill Pattern

10. Zig-Zag: Zig-Zag is a type of infill pattern available in Cura. This pattern is similar to the standard line or rectilinear infill, but with each new layer, the lines are shifted half a line width, creating a zig-zag effect. This can provide a good balance between strength and print speed.

Zig-Zag Infill Pattern

11. Cross: Cross-infill pattern is available in Cura. The Cross pattern is designed to avoid long straight lines. This means it can bend well in all sideways directions but isn’t super strong. The Cross pattern doesn’t need retraction, so it stops flexible materials from oozing out. However, the printed object will have higher strength in the Z axis making it less flexible vertically.

Cross Infill Pattern

12. Cross 3D:

The Cross 3D pattern gets rid of the problem of being too strong in one direction that the regular Cross pattern has. However, it takes more time to print. Cross 3D is not very strong, which makes it flexible in all directions.

When you use Cura’s Cross 3D infill pattern, your printed part will be more flexible compared to using the Cross or Concentric patterns. Like the regular Cross pattern, Cross 3D doesn’t need retraction, so it’s less likely to have issues with oozing.

Cross 3D Infill Pattern

13. Gyroid: Gyroid infill pattern is available in Cura and Prusa Slicer. The gyroid pattern is based on a mathematical concept known as a triply periodic minimal surface. This means that the pattern can be extended infinitely in three dimensions without repeating itself, creating a complex yet balanced structure. It is characterized by a network of interlocking curves that form a three-dimensional maze-like structure.

Gyroid Infill Pattern

14. Lightning: Lightning infill pattern is available in Cura and Prusa Slicer. This infill pattern is known for its unique and intricate design, resembling the branching pattern of lightning bolts. This pattern consists of a network of interconnected lines that crisscross in a random or semi-random fashion, creating a visually striking and aesthetically pleasing internal structure.

Lightning Infill Pattern

15. Rectilinear: Rectilinear infill pattern is available in Prusa Slicer. This infill pattern creates a grid-like arrangement of lines that run parallel to each other in two mutually perpendicular directions. It forms a lattice-like internal structure that provides a good balance between strength, speed of printing, and material usage.

Rectilinear Infill Pattern

16. Aligned Rectilinear: Aligned Rectilinear infill pattern is available in Prusa Slicer. The “Aligned Rectilinear” pattern is characterised by straight lines that run parallel to the edges of the object, creating a grid-like structure. This pattern is often used because it balances strength and the amount of material used.

Aligned Rectilinear Infill Pattern

17. Stars: Stars infill pattern is available in Prusa Slicer. The pattern utilizes a foundation of triangles, but the paths are strategically shifted to form six-pointed stars. Similar to the preceding infill, this pattern is generated through intersecting lines within a single layer.

Stars

18. Honeycomb: Honeycomb infill pattern is available in Prusa Slicer. This pattern, as the name suggests, resembles the structure of a honeycomb with its hexagonal shapes. It is known for its strength and efficiency, providing excellent structural support for the printed object while using less material compared to other infill patterns.
Honeycomb Infill Pattern
19. 3D Honeycomb: Honeycomb 3D infill pattern is available in Prusa Slicer. This pattern, as the name suggests, resembles the structure of a honeycomb with its hexagonal shapes. The 3D Honeycomb infill is known for its excellent strength-to-weight ratio.
3D Honeycomb Infill Pattern

20. Hilbert curve: Hilbert curve 3D infill pattern is available in Prusa Slicer. Hilbert Curve” is named after the mathematician David Hilbert. This pattern creates a continuous fractal space-filling curve inside a 3D printed object. The Hilbert Curve is known for its unique properties, such as its ability to fill space in a very uniform manner, which can contribute to the strength and stability of the 3D printed object.

Hilbert curve Infill Pattern

21. Archimedean chords: Archimedean chords infill pattern is available in Prusa Slicer. It is named after the ancient Greek mathematician Archimedes. In this pattern, you will see a series of circular curve lines that intersect to form a pattern that resembles a series of chords across a circle.

Archimedean chords Infill Pattern

22. Octagram Spiral: Octagram spiral infill pattern is available in Prusa slicer. This pattern is named for its resemblance to an eight-pointed star. This pattern not only provides the object with support and structure but also conserves material usage.

Octagram spiral Infill Pattern

23. Adaptive Cubic: Adaptive cubic infill pattern is available in Prusa Slicer. This pattern adjusts the size of the cubes based on the needs of the specific part being printed. It’s designed to provide strength where needed while reducing material use and print time.

Adaptive cubic Infill Pattern

24. Support Cubic: Support cubic infill pattern is available in Prusa Slicer. It’s designed to provide stability to overhanging parts of the model during the printing process. In this you will see the pattern created is cubic, providing a strong and stable structure. It’s also designed to be relatively easy to remove after printing.

Support cubic Infill Pattern

25. Line: The line infill pattern in Prusa slicer is a type of infill that features paths printed at an acute angle, similar to the rectilinear infill but not parallel to each other. It is one of the simplest and fastest infill, printed in both directions (rotated by 90°) in each layer, allowing material to accumulate in spots where the paths cross. This infill is more solid and has better layer adhesion than the rectilinear infill. The line infill pattern is suitable for general use and provides a good balance between speed, material consumption, and structural integrity.

Line Infill Pattren

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